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Monthly Archives / August 2014

  • Aug 29 / 2014
  • Comments Off on A Biography of “Panic”: Thank God We Are Mad!
Ancient Greek

A Biography of “Panic”: Thank God We Are Mad!

Pavement mosaic with the head of Pan. Roman artwork, Antonine period, 138–192 A.D.

 

by Susi Ferrarello, Ph.D.

Dialogue between two Arcadian shepherds:

“Did you see what I saw?”
“Oh my god yes, it’s Pan, RUN!”

Apparently this exchange was so frequent in Arcadia (a pastoral mythical area of the Peloponnesus), that it gave birth to the word panic (panikon deima in Euripides). Continue Reading

  • Aug 25 / 2014
  • Comments Off on Hektor vs. Aeneas: Husbands and Fathers in the Iliad and the Aeneid
Latin

Hektor vs. Aeneas: Husbands and Fathers in the Iliad and the Aeneid

Aeneas defeats Turnus by Luca Giordano 1634–1705

 

 by Rebecca Gove, M.A.T.

In Hektor of the Iliad and Aeneas of the Aeneid, we see two men from Troy portrayed in different lights with respect to their attitudes concerning fatherhood and being a husband. Hektor is the primary defender of the city, a noble and deadly warrior, but also a husband to Andromache and father to Astyanax, yet he always places battle above the needs of those dependent on him. Aeneas acts in the opposite way, choosing to take his family and escape the burning city, but he needs assistance from various sources in order to reach that decision and cannot complete his escape with his family intact. Continue Reading

  • Aug 22 / 2014
  • Comments Off on Spoken Latin: A modern remedy for the nation’s age-old reading problems?
Latin

Spoken Latin: A modern remedy for the nation’s age-old reading problems?

Teachers Paul Perrot and Jennifer Larson study active Latin in Carlisle Pa

 

Posted by Magister Andrew

Take a look at what the Washington Post says about the new movement of spoken Latin, learning the language through the “active” approach. What can speaking the Latin language do for you? Better English skills, vocabulary, grammar knowledge…well, obviously. But is that all? Read to find out! Continue Reading

  • Aug 20 / 2014
  • Comments Off on How to Translate English Songs into Latin
Latin

How to Translate English Songs into Latin

Roman music-themed fresco from the first century Palatine Museum

 

by Victoria Neuman, M.A.

The topic of my last blog post was why you, as a budding or seasoned Latin scholar, should consider translating a popular song into Latin. This time I want to delve deeper into precisely how this can be done. Continue Reading

  • Aug 15 / 2014
  • Comments Off on Ovid’s Poetic Style in the Amores (A Critical Analysis)
Classical Literature

Ovid’s Poetic Style in the Amores (A Critical Analysis)

Publius Ovidius Naso Ovid in the Nuremberg Chronicle

 

by Rebecca Gove, M.A.T.

Ovid is constantly drawing our attention to his poetic style; in fact, he seems to lavish in the fact that his style is so different from the other elegists of the Augustan Age. He offers a primarily dactylic meter, which he appears to favor in Poem 1.1 and must write elegy only when Cupid steals away a foot from every other line. Continue Reading

  • Aug 12 / 2014
  • Comments Off on Archaeologists Investigate a Massive Ancient Mycenaean Citadel (from Popular Archaeology)
Ancient Greek

Archaeologists Investigate a Massive Ancient Mycenaean Citadel (from Popular Archaeology)

Aerial view of the Mycenaean citadel Glas courtesy Christofilis Maggidis

 

Posted by Magister Andrew

Check out this awesome article from Popular Archaeology magazine about the recent excavation of a major Mycenaean citadel in the Greek region of Boeotia!  It’s a really interesting read.

http://popular-archaeology.com/issue/06052014/article/archaeologists-investigate-a-massive-ancient-mycenaean-citadel

 

 

  • Aug 06 / 2014
  • Comments Off on An Original Letter from Lucretia to Sextus Tarquinius (A Reflection on Ovid’s Heroides)
Classical Literature

An Original Letter from Lucretia to Sextus Tarquinius (A Reflection on Ovid’s Heroides)

The Rape of Lucretia, with Sextus Taquinius  (Ovid's Heroides)

 

by Rebecca Gove, M.A.T.

Latin Elegiac poetry has always been a particular fascination of mine: Horace, Catullus, Propertius…all stunning poets who created literary gold with the help of their Muses. But one poet always held my fancy more than others: Publius Ovidius Naso, who wrote perhaps one of the most creative and unique collections of elegiac couplets that are extant today: the Heroides. 16 fictional letters (some scholars attribute 21, but this is controversial) from Greek and Roman mythological women to their absent lovers depict every variation of the classic “Dear John” letter and every emotion of a great soap opera: passion, betrayal, scorn, envy, confusion, rage, and more. If you have never had the pleasure of reading Ovid’s Heroides, I highly recommend a few of the following texts on Amazon: Continue Reading

  • Aug 04 / 2014
  • Comments Off on Greek Medicine Part 2, “Give Me Something for the Pain” (Bon Jovi, 1995)
Ancient Greek

Greek Medicine Part 2, “Give Me Something for the Pain” (Bon Jovi, 1995)

Ancient Greek doctor Erasistratus treating Antiochus with Greek medicine

 

by Derick Alexandre, Ph.D.

Hi everybody!

My last post focused on the “ill” effects of some ancient Greek pharmaceuticals, black hellebore in particular. The grueling bouts of vomiting and diarrhea alone would make anyone question the wisdom of administering hellebore, cure or no cure. Yet the Greeks persisted anyway. As Herophilus of Chalcedon said, “Drugs are the hands of the gods.” (Just say no!) Continue Reading