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Monthly Archives / November 2014

  • Nov 21 / 2014
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Latin

The Colosseum Was a Bustling Bazaar in the Dark Ages!

Photo of the Colosseum Rome

 

Posted by Magister Andrew

The Colosseum is well known as an arena for gladiatorial battles and gruesome public executions. But according to News Network Archaeology, archaeologists who have dug beneath some of the 80 arched entrances that lead into the Colosseum have found the foundations of homes, terracotta sewage pipes, and shards of crockery, all dating from the ninth century AD. Who was living there? Find out now! Continue Reading

  • Nov 14 / 2014
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Latin

Tutorial video: Parts of the Body in Latin

A screen shot from Harvey’s video with his son

 

by Patrick Harvey, J.D.

Check out the new tutorial video from Carmenta Instructor Patrick Harvey and his adorable little assistant Joseph and learn how to say the parts of the body in Latin! You don’t have to be a doctor to watch this video…even a 4-year-old can do it! Lingua Latina vivit! Continue Reading

  • Nov 11 / 2014
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Latin

An Ancient Ghost Story: Philinnion and Machates

Photo of Colosseum

 

Posted by Magister Andrew

Ghost stories aren’t a modern phenomenon; in fact, they have existed for thousands of years. Joshua J. Mark from “The Ancient History Encyclopedia” writes here about one of the oldest ghost stories in the West, the tale of Philinnion and Machates as told by the Romans Phlegon of Tralles (2nd century CE) and Proclus (5th century CE). The story is reported to have taken place during the reign of Philip II of Macedon (359-336 BCE). Although Halloween is over, there is still time for a nice scary story, and even better if it’s from Ancient Rome! Continue Reading

  • Nov 04 / 2014
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Latin

Taboo Deformation: A Linguistic Phenomenon

Orestes pursued by the Furies, by William-Adolphe Bouguereau, 1862

 

by Larry Myer, M.A.

One of my favorite linguistic phenomena is called taboo deformation. This refers to the process of transforming a word that is taboo, i.e. a word that was considered inappropriate or even dangerous to pronounce in its unmodified form. This phenomenon is widespread in all languages and is found frequently with holy names and swear words. Think of all the modifications of the names of God or Jesus in English, like gosh or jeez. Other English examples include the obsolescent and now largely humorous interjection gadzooks, which is composed of a modified form of the word “God” plus the word “hooks” (referring to the nails used to crucify Jesus). Continue Reading