:::: MENU ::::

Monthly Archives / February 2015

  • Feb 24 / 2015
  • Comments Off on Much ado about nothing: Floccinaucinihilipilification
Latin

Much ado about nothing: Floccinaucinihilipilification

Old books with the word Floccinaucinihilipilification

 

by Todd Clary, Ph.D.

I have seen quite a few articles, internet posts and YouTube videos about the pronunciation, usage and history of the English word floccinaucinihilipilification ‘the estimation of something or someone as valueless’, but I have not seen anything written expressly for students of Latin. Continue Reading

  • Feb 20 / 2015
  • Comments Off on Roman Law
Latin

Roman Law

Cicero Denounces Catiline by Cesare Maccari (1840–1919)

 

Posted by Magister Andrew

Did you know that many legal terms from the Romans are still used today in the field of law? To learn more about Roman law, check out this great article by Mark Cartwright! Continue Reading

  • Feb 17 / 2015
  • Comments Off on Super Serpents, Hyper Herpetologists and the Origins of Greek Aitch
Ancient Greek

Super Serpents, Hyper Herpetologists and the Origins of Greek Aitch

Combination of the Attalou Stoa photo with the Greek alphabet

 

by Todd Clary, Ph.D.

Most dialects of Ancient Greek have plenty of aitches, always at the beginnings of words, and represented in orthography not as a full-fledged letter, but by an inverted apostrophe known as the spiritus asper, which is Latin for ‘rough breathing’. Hence, Greek ἅπαξ ‘once’ transliterates ‘hapax’ but ἀποκάλυψις ‘revelation, apocalypse’ transliterates ‘apokalupsis’ (note that the non-inverted apostrophe above an initial vowel simply denotes the lack of aitch). Continue Reading

  • Feb 06 / 2015
  • Comments Off on A Not Very Famous Museum—But Not Without Interest
Latin

A Not Very Famous Museum—But Not Without Interest

The Archaeological Museum of Zagreb

 

by Neda Helena Jeny, Ph.D.

About four months ago I moved to Savannah—a beautiful old city, full of historic houses and historic parks. The biggest and, I suppose, most famous park is Forsyth Park—so famous that, last Christmas, when Savannah Ballet Theatre performed The Nutcracker, its dance of flowers took place in what was clearly meant to represent Forsyth Park. (Do they do it that way every year, I wonder?) Continue Reading

  • Feb 03 / 2015
  • Comments Off on The Mystery of the Roman Dodecahedrons
Latin

The Mystery of the Roman Dodecahedrons

Photo of the Roman Dodecahedrons

 

Posted by Magister Andrew

Have you heard of the Roman Dodecahedron? It’s been called a war weapon, a candlestick, a child’s toy, a weather gauge, an astronomical instrument, and a religious symbol — just to name a few. But what is this mystery object, really? Read this great article from Legends and Chronicles to find out! Continue Reading