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Monthly Archives / November 2015

  • Nov 27 / 2015
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Latin

Food, Fun, and Festival: Roman Gastronomy in Celebratory Occasions

Spring (1894) by Lawrence Alma-Tadema, depicting the Cerealia in a Roman street (J. Paul Getty Museum)

 

by Kostas Petropoulos, M.A.

Something that often interests us is to compare the different holidays between our culture & those of civilizations past. Since we happen to be at a particularly fertile time of the year in that regard, it’s only natural that we may turn our attention towards such an activity. Being as it is first in line in the end-of-year Big Three, Thanksgiving is a great place to start. Continue Reading

  • Nov 24 / 2015
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Ancient Greek

Shipwrecked at the Fourni Archipelago

Underwater Archeology

 

By Edward Townes, M.Sc.

Located in the Aegean Sea, closer to Anatolia than the Greek mainland, the Fourni Archipelago must have been a high traffic-shipping lane for the ancient world. This year underwater archeologists have added 12% to the number of known shipwrecks in Greek territorial waters by discovering a staggering 22 shipwrecks on just one excursion to the archipelago! Continue Reading

  • Nov 20 / 2015
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Latin

How Learning Latin Will Improve Your Math

Pythagoras

 

By Edward Townes, M.Sc.

In modern times we tend to view mathematics as belonging to an academic discipline quite distinct from language. This was not always the case; indeed this view didn’t prevail until the very recent past. In the classical period, with some refinements and adjustments in the Renaissance period and 19th century, the gold standard was a Liberal Arts education. This education was designed to allow a free man to reach full expression of his potential. Whereas today much of our education is focused on learning the vocabulary of the world and specializing in a particular niche, the ancients saw education as an opportunity to teach the next generation how to be well-rounded and to give them the means to think and engage with whatever subject had their attention at any time. Continue Reading

  • Nov 16 / 2015
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Latin

A Polyglot’s Advice on How to Effectively Learn Languages

Chris Huff on the Great Wall of China

 

Posted by Magister Andrew

Chris Huff is a young polyglot. He is fluent in six languages and learning many more. In this interview on For the Love of Languages, Chris shares with us his motivations and passions for learning languages, and tips for other aspiring poluglots that he has discovered in his own language journey Continue Reading

  • Nov 12 / 2015
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Latin

Why Studying Latin Will Make You an Élite Student

élite student

 

By Maria Luisa De Seta, Ph.D.

Getting into a good college is something high school students and parents both desire and dread with equal energy. And one of the most important factors in college admissions is the student’s standardized test scores, daunting tests like the SAT, GRE, MCAT or LSAT. But how can a student get control of this, improve his or her scores and simultaneously learn a subject that looks great on a high school transcript? Continue Reading

  • Nov 10 / 2015
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Latin

Why Conversation is the Key to Latin Fluency

Language Overlap

 

By Edward Townes, M.Sc.

The Carmenta Online Latin School employs Latin conversation class as one of its key strategies for achieving true fluency in Latin. The reasoning and research behind this strategy has become clearer over the last couple decades as there has been more and more of a renewed use of Latin as a spoken language in curricular and extracurricular settings. Read on to find out why the common (non-conversational) method of teaching Latin works so poorly and why using Latin as a conversational language is the real key to greatly improved student competence and facility of use. Continue Reading

  • Nov 03 / 2015
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Latin

It’s The Great Pumpkin, Claudius: Thoughts on the Apocolocyntosis Divi Claudii

Pumpkinification

 

by Kostas Petropoulos, M.A.

Now that we are firmly entrenched in autumn, and Halloween and Thanksgiving are nigh, this presents an excellent opportunity to talk about one of my favorite works of Latin literature, Seneca’s Apocolocyntosis Divi Claudii. The word Apocolocyntosis (Greek: ‘Αποκολοκύνθωσις) is roughly translated as “Gourdification” or if you prefer, the more colorful “Pumpkinification”.
Continue Reading