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Monthly Archives / December 2015

  • Dec 31 / 2015
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Latin

Roman Sword Discovered off Oak Island Suggests Ancient Mariners Visited New World 1,000 Years Before Columbus

Oak Island, Nova Scotia, Inset: The Roman sword found in water just off the mysterious Oak Island, Nova Scotia

 

Posted by Magister Andrew

Researchers investigating the mysterious Oak Island, located on the south shore of Nova Scotia, Canada, have made a startling announcement regarding the discovery of a Roman ceremonial sword and what is believed to be a Roman shipwreck, suggesting that ancient mariners may have visited North America more than a thousand years before Columbus. Continue Reading

  • Dec 24 / 2015
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Latin

A-Caroling We Will Go: Rome & the History of the Christmas Carol

Christmas carols

 

by Kostas Petropoulos, M.A.

As I mentioned in my last entry, this time of year is especially rich with subject material on which we may draw. The Christmas season is fast approaching and with it the sounds of caroling will soon be filling the air. How many of us have heard the glorious tones of “O Holy Night” or “Joy To The World” without knowing the history behind them? In order to fully understand this, here first is an extremely brief (and admittedly oversimplified) account of the origin of the Christmas holiday. Continue Reading

  • Dec 22 / 2015
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Ancient Greek

Why Learn Ancient Greek?

Ancient Greece

 

By Edward Townes, M.Sc.

We often think of the Ancient Greeks and Romans as being very similar, both being from the Classical, Iron Age, of the Mediterranean world. The reasons for studying Greek culture and language are similar to the reasons for studying the Romans and their language, Latin, but there are also a number of unique reasons why Ancient Greece is so important and why it is a worthwhile area of study in its own right. Continue Reading

  • Dec 18 / 2015
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Latin

Ancient Etruscan Tomb Found ‘Undisturbed’ In Italy

Intact, packed Etruscan tomb found in Italy.

 

Posted by Magister Andrew

An intact 2,300-year-old Etruscan tomb recently discovered in Italy may help shed light on an ancient enigmatic civilization that flourished centuries before the rise of the Roman Empire. Inside, archaeologists have found a number of artifacts including urns and a marble head, as well as two sarcophagi. Continue Reading

  • Dec 15 / 2015
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Ancient Greek

Wax Statues, Marble Statues, Classical Statues… What Do We Really Know about Them? Part Three

Janine Antoni, Lick and Lather, 1993.

 

by Neda Helena Jeny, Ph.D.

Three months ago I wrote a blog about the classical statues of Greece and Rome, and how they influenced the subsequent art of sculpture of the Western world.

And I had an unexpected confirmation—though of a somewhat unusual sort, when I visited Jepson Center for the Arts in Savannah, Georgia, last summer. It had a temporary exhibition of recent modern art (the last decades of the 20th century, if I remember correctly)—on the whole, very different from anything classical, and yet… Continue Reading

  • Dec 08 / 2015
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Latin

Reasons to Learn Latin

School Hall

 

By Edward Townes, M.Sc.

For over 2,000 years Latin has been a medium for learned men and women of European civilizations. There are many reasons for this beyond pure tradition, and their importance persists today. This article will explore some of those reasons. Continue Reading

  • Dec 04 / 2015
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Ancient Greek

The Hippocratic Corpus and the Nature of Disease, Pt. 1

Hippocrates monument, Kos, Greece

 

by Derick Alexandre, Ph.D.

The Hippocratic Corpus (HC) consists of about sixty texts written in Greek by multiple unknown authors on various subjects of medical and scientific interest in the 5th-3rd centuries BC. Before the 20th century, scholars attributed at least some of these documents to the historical Hippocrates (460-370 BC), a famed physician of Cos referenced several times in Plato’s dialogues. While historical research has now cast into doubt Hippocratic authorship of all of these works, their importance for tracing medical theory from its philosophical origins to a more pragmatic, empirical “art” of healing cannot be overestimated. Continue Reading