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Monthly Archives / June 2016

  • Jun 28 / 2016
  • Comments Off on Studies in Latin Morphology, Part I Alternate dative and ablative plural endings of the first declension
Latin

Studies in Latin Morphology, Part I Alternate dative and ablative plural endings of the first declension

Detail of Pantheon, Rome

 

By Kostas Petropoulos, M.A.

Use of the Latin suffix -abus in the dative and ablative plural of certain first declension nouns is owed to the need for a distinction between the masculine and corresponding feminine forms.1 One such instance where this need may have arisen was in the case of a will or other legal provision if there should have been, for example, both sons and daughters involved. Continue Reading

  • Jun 21 / 2016
  • Comments Off on Fahrenheit 451 and the Importance of a Classical Education
Latin

Fahrenheit 451 and the Importance of a Classical Education

Fahrenheit 451 and the Importance of a Classical Education

 

By André Bastos Gurgel, OAB

“Intellectual? That’s a swear word. Drop discipline. Kill Latin. Poison English. Damn grammar. Forget spelling. Empty the theatres. Shut the cinemas.”

The United States has made great contributions to world literature through lauded writers like Mark Twain, Nathaniel Hawthorne, and Herman Melville. There’s another, often overlooked, author who I think also deserves to be listed among the greats: Ray Bradbury. Continue Reading

  • Jun 15 / 2016
  • Comments Off on Did the Greeks Invent the Automatically Opening Door?
Ancient Greek

Did the Greeks Invent the Automatically Opening Door?

The automatic opening of the temple gates after sacrifice had taken place on its altar

 

Posted by Magister Andrew

Did you know that the Ancient Greeks had automatically opening doors? The invention of Heron of Alexandria, which permitted the automatic opening of the temple gates after the sacrifice on its altar, is history’s first architectural automatization. This is just one of many marvels in the Hi-Tech Inventions of Ancient Greece exhibition at the Museum of Ancient Greek Technology, Katakolo, Greece. Click on the link to see exactly how this remarkable device worked! Continue Reading

  • Jun 14 / 2016
  • Comments Off on Why the Average Ancient Roman Worker Was Dead by 30
Latin

Why the Average Ancient Roman Worker Was Dead by 30

The research paints a grim picture of the dangers faced by ancient Roman workers

 

Posted by Magister Andrew

A groundbreaking study of 2,000 ancient Roman skeletons shows that many poor inhabitants of the city of Rome were riddled with arthritis, suffered broken bones, and were generally dead before 30. Continue Reading

  • Jun 10 / 2016
  • Comments Off on Aristotle’s 2,400-Year-Old Tomb Found at Stagira
Ancient Greek

Aristotle’s 2,400-Year-Old Tomb Found at Stagira

Aristotle’s tomb

 

Posted by Magister Andrew

Greek archaeologists at Ancient Stagira, Central Macedonia, say they have found Aristotle’s tomb. Addressing the “Aristotle 2400 Years World Congress”, they point to the 2,400-year-old tomb as the most important finding from the 20-year excavation. Click the link to learn all about it! Continue Reading

  • Jun 07 / 2016
  • Comments Off on Ancient Roman Treasure Trove Found off Coast of Caesarea
Latin

Ancient Roman Treasure Trove Found off Coast of Caesarea

Ancient Roman treasure trove found off coast of Caesarea

 

Posted by Magister Andrew

A treasure trove of ancient Roman artifacts that sank when a merchant ship went down off the coast of Caesarea some 1,600 years ago was discovered recently. The Israel Antiquities Authority called the find the biggest treasure uncovered in at least 30 years! Continue Reading