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Monthly Archives / January 2017

  • Jan 31 / 2017
  • Comments Off on Tips for Latin Teachers: Roman Proverbs for Students
Latin

Tips for Latin Teachers: Roman Proverbs for Students

"Carpe Diem" (Seize the Day) Plaque by Piazza Pisano

 

By André Bastos Gurgel, OAB

The ancients were very fond of proverbs. The Greeks, Romans, Japanese, and Chinese all knew the immense amount of wisdom contained within these short, profound sayings. In this article we’ll look at some of the most memorable proverbs produced by the Romans and why Latin teachers should familiarize their students with them. Continue Reading

  • Jan 26 / 2017
  • Comments Off on Tips for Advanced Latin Students
Latin

Tips for Advanced Latin Students

Carmenta tutor with his student

 

By André Bastos Gurgel, OAB

Latin teachers seem to agree that students usually take three or four years to master Latin grammar. Once the student has done this, it’s time to start reading the classics, but the question is which author to read first. In this article we propose several texts and explain why they are a good option for advanced Latin students. Continue Reading

  • Jan 24 / 2017
  • Comments Off on Comparative Mythology: Cosmic Wars
Ancient World

Comparative Mythology: Cosmic Wars

Zeus and Thetis by Jean Auguste Dominique Ingres (1780-1867)

 

By André Bastos Gurgel, OAB

Comparative mythology is the fascinating examination of myths from different cultures. One of the best aspects of analyzing the ancient Greeks, Hindus, and Nordic peoples is that they have many legends in common. Today we will discuss a myth which is present in three different cultures: cosmic wars! Continue Reading

  • Jan 19 / 2017
  • Comments Off on Fabricius: Fair Play Even in Times of War
Latin

Fabricius: Fair Play Even in Times of War

Pyrrhus of Epirus

 

By André Bastos Gurgel, OAB

We are all familiar with the saying “all is fair in love and war.” History, however, shows us that the Romans would not agree with this–at least not the war part. Today we’ll be talking about a Roman commander who refused to participate in a plot which would have killed his opponent in a cowardly manner. Continue Reading

  • Jan 17 / 2017
  • Comments Off on Scottish Gaelic: Poetry in the Highlands
Classical Literature

Scottish Gaelic: Poetry in the Highlands

MacIan print of Highlanders wearing kilts and plaids separately

 

By André Bastos Gurgel, OAB and John Priest, B.A Cert. Min

Scottish Gaelic is a direct descendent of an early medieval language, Old Irish, and has produced amazing literature with beautiful poems which are sometimes even set to music. Nevertheless, too many Scots still ignore this treasure of their culture or even think that there is no Scottish poetic tradition in any other language but Lowland Scots, which is related to English. In this article we have selected a few wonderful pieces of poetry produced by natives of the Scottish Highlands. Continue Reading

  • Jan 12 / 2017
  • Comments Off on Overlooked Literature: Chinese Literature
Classical Literature

Overlooked Literature: Chinese Literature

 

By André Bastos Gurgel, OAB

China has produced real treasures of literature, from works of poetry to those of romance and history. However, this 5000-year-old genre is often overlooked; consequently, there are very few college departments dedicated to Chinese literature. For this reason, we at Carmenta Latin School believe it is time to make the general public more familiar with China’s great literary tradition. We have, therefore, selected three major works produced by this tremendous civilization. Continue Reading

  • Jan 10 / 2017
  • Comments Off on Overlooked Literature: Anglo-Saxon
Classical Literature

Overlooked Literature: Anglo-Saxon

Beowulf: king Geats

 

By André Bastos Gurgel, OAB

Today we’re going to look at some of the great literature produced by the Anglo-Saxons, the people whose language gave birth to Middle and Modern English. Although it is spoken by billions around the world, most people don’t realize that English comes from Anglo-Saxon or Old English. There are some marvelous pieces of Old English literature including an epic poem, historiography, and wisdom literature. Continue Reading

  • Jan 05 / 2017
  • Comments Off on Io Saturnalia, Amici: Happy Saturnalia, Friends!
Ancient World

Io Saturnalia, Amici: Happy Saturnalia, Friends!

Etruscan dancers from the tomb of the Triclinium in the Necropolis of Monterozzi, c. 470 BCE

 

By André Bastos Gurgel, OAB

“During my week the serious is barred: no business allowed. Drinking and being drunk, noise and games of dice, appointing of kings and feasting of slaves, singing naked, clapping … an occasional ducking of corked faces in icy water – such are the functions over which I preside.” Continue Reading

  • Jan 03 / 2017
  • Comments Off on Virgil’s Death of Laocoön
Ancient Greek

Virgil’s Death of Laocoön

“Laocoön and His Sons”, Vatican Museum, Vatican City

 

By André Bastos Gurgel, OAB

Today we’ll be looking at the events that took place a few days before the fall of Troy. When the Trojans found the wooden horse, they were not sure whether they should keep it or burn it. That is when a wise priest of Apollo named Laocoön tried to warn them about the danger of keeping the Greek “gift”. The Olympian gods, however, had already decided that Troy had to be destroyed, and they would not hesitate to kill any mortal who would dare warn the Trojans about the Greek trap. Continue Reading