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Monthly Archives / April 2017

  • Apr 27 / 2017
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Latin

Learning Latin with Odo of Cheriton

The Stork and the Wolf fable

 

By André Bastos Gurgel, OAB

Have you heard of the writer Odo of Cheriton? No? I hadn’t either. In fact, I discovered him by chance during a search for medieval fabulists. Medieval Latin has many literary treasures that, sadly, have been overlooked, and this is clearly the case with Odo of Cheriton. With this in mind, I’ve decided to write an article about his life and works and explain why I think his fables are useful for Latin students. Continue Reading

  • Apr 25 / 2017
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Ancient Greek

The Best Textbooks for Homeric Greek Students

A Reading from Homer by Lawrence Alma Tadema

 

By André Bastos Gurgel, OAB

Homer is one of the greatest authors of world literature. His epic poems have always been considered masterpieces and students will benefit greatly from access to these works in the original Ancient Greek. Reading Homer, however, is not an easy task. That’s why a number of books have been written specifically for the Homeric Greek student. In this article I list what I consider to be the best books for Homeric Greek students. Continue Reading

  • Apr 20 / 2017
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Latin

Tips for Latin Teachers: Phaedrus and His Fables

The Best Fables by Phaedrus

 

By André Bastos Gurgel, OAB

Despite what many people think, fables are not aimed exclusively at children; in fact the ancients cherished them as valuable moral tales for all ages, and we see examples of this genre in many different civilizations. Fables were thought to be highly relevant as sources of wisdom and important in shaping character. Continue Reading

  • Apr 18 / 2017
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Classical Literature

How 20th-Century Lawyers Sued Jonathan Swift

Gulliver Exhibited to the Brobdingnag Farmer (painting by Richard Redgrave)

 

By André Bastos Gurgel, OAB

The title of this article may sound bizarre. How could Jonathan Swift possibly be sued nowadays? Let me explain how! I corresponded for over ten years with a Brazilian journalist named Janer Cristaldo. Although he held two degrees in law and philosophy plus a Ph.D. in literature from the Sorbonne, he worked his whole life as a journalist as writing was his real passion. He once wrote an article about an event that took place during his early years as a law student, when he published an excerpt from Gulliver’s Travels in his school’s journal. Believe it or not, Jonathan Swift was subsequently sued by both the Order of Brazilian Lawyers and the Association of Magistrates! Continue Reading

  • Apr 13 / 2017
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Latin

Learning Latin with Catullus

“Catullus at Lesbia's” by Lawrence Alma-Tadema

 

By André Bastos Gurgel, OAB

Catullus is one of the greatest, most well-known Latin poets. His poetry is certainly no piece of cake, however. In this article I hope to offer teachers some guidelines on how to introduce students to the works of this Roman writer and suggest which poems they should read first. Continue Reading

  • Apr 11 / 2017
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Latin

Teaching Latin with Children’s Books

Dr. Seuss in Latin

 

By André Bastos Gurgel, OAB

Many people aren’t aware of how many classics of children’s literature have been translated into Latin. In this post I will talk about three such works which teachers can use to help students learn Latin more quickly while having more fun. Continue Reading

  • Apr 04 / 2017
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Latin

Isidore of Seville: the Perfect Introduction to Latin Prose

Statue of Isidore of Seville (c.560–636) at the entrance staircase of the National Library of Spain, in Madrid

 

By André Bastos Gurgel, OAB

Many Latin works from the Middle Ages tend to be overlooked by scholars. I believe it’s time to change this. In that vein, today I’ll be talking about Isidore of Seville, whose works can be a great way to introduce students to Latin prose. In this article I hope to make Latin teachers and students more familiar with the work of this great writer. Continue Reading