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Monthly Archives / October 2017

  • Oct 31 / 2017
  • Comments Off on Claudian: an Overlooked Writer
Latin

Claudian: an Overlooked Writer

Olympus: The Fall of the Giants by Francisco Bayeu

 

By André Bastos Gurgel, OAB

Introduction

Have you ever heard of the Roman writer Claudian? If you haven’t, you can’t be blamed since he’s been mostly ignored, not having lived in the so-called “Golden Age of Latin Literature”. I found out about him totally by chance when I was researching writers from the late empire. As you may know, at Carmenta we make an effort to rehabilitate good Latin writers who may have been overlooked simply because of the time when they were born, and so in this article I’ll do my best to give you the main points. Continue Reading

  • Oct 26 / 2017
  • Comments Off on Classical Interviews: Horace
Ancient World

Classical Interviews: Horace

“Horace reads before Maecenas”, by Fyodor Bronnikov

 

By André Bastos Gurgel, OAB

I first got the idea for these made-up interviews from the novel Gog by the Italian writer Giovanni Papini, though his “interviews” were with people a bit more contemporary. Today I will be interviewing one of the greatest poets not only of Rome but also of all time, in my humble opinion. Continue Reading

  • Oct 24 / 2017
  • Comments Off on Sherlock Holmes: Detective, Linguist, and Scholar
Classical Literature

Sherlock Holmes: Detective, Linguist, and Scholar

Statue of Sherlock Holmes, London

 

By André Bastos Gurgel, OAB

Introduction

We are all familiar with Conan Doyle’s greatest character, the inimitable Sherlock Holmes. In the following article, I will be pointing out an aspect of this character you may have missed, that he wasn’t just a master detective, but he was also a man who cared about classics and literature. Continue Reading

  • Oct 19 / 2017
  • Comments Off on Classical Interviews: Emperor Tiberius
Ancient World

Classical Interviews: Emperor Tiberius

Statue of Tiberius from Priverno

 

By André Bastos Gurgel, OAB

This is one in a series of interviews with well-known personalities from the ancient Greek and Roman world. Today I feel honoured to interview Rome’s second emperor and Augustus’ adopted son, Tiberius. Continue Reading

  • Oct 17 / 2017
  • Comments Off on The Chinese Trojan Horse
Ancient World

The Chinese Trojan Horse

China's Terracotta Warriors

 

By André Bastos Gurgel, OAB

Introduction

Today I would like to share a story which I heard from my Chinese tutor: the tale of Gou Jian and the Chinese Trojan Horse. Continue Reading

  • Oct 12 / 2017
  • Comments Off on Classical Interviews: Emperor Claudius
Ancient World

Classical Interviews: Emperor Claudius

Bust of Emperor Claudius

 

By André Bastos Gurgel, OAB

I got the idea for these made-up interviews from the novel “Grog” by the Italian writer Giuseppe Papini, though his “interviews” were with people a bit more contemporary. Today’s interview is with Rome’s fourth emperor, Claudius, who welcomed me at his palace. Although many historians accuse him of being weak and stupid, it was obvious to me that the man I was interviewing was a wise scholar. Continue Reading

  • Oct 10 / 2017
  • Comments Off on Carmenta Film Review: 300 Spartans: A Greek Tragedy of a Movie! ★☆☆☆☆
Book, Film, and TV Reviews

Carmenta Film Review: 300 Spartans: A Greek Tragedy of a Movie! ★☆☆☆☆

Poster Artwork of the“300” movie

 

By André Bastos Gurgel, OAB

Introduction

This is part of a series of articles about classics-related books and movies. Today I will review the movie “300”, based on the historical Battle of Thermopylae in 480 BC, when three hundred Spartans held back a huge Persian army for three days. I really loved the 1962 movie adaptation of these events, Rudolph Maté’s “The 300 Spartans”version, but was very disappointed in this new version, so disappointed that I have given it only one star. Here’s why… Continue Reading

  • Oct 05 / 2017
  • Comments Off on The Banning of Shakespeare in English Schools
English

The Banning of Shakespeare in English Schools

Shakespeare’s portrait

 

By André Bastos Gurgel, OAB and John Priest, B.A Cert. Min

Introduction

If you liked my article on the novel Fahrenheit 451, you will probably enjoy today’s story about an instance in which Ray Bradbury’s prophecy came true. Bradbury’s book describes a dystopian society where reading books is forbidden. It may sound too fantastic to come true, but something like it happened in 2009 when the English authorities removed the obligation to study Shakespeare’s works from public school curricula. Continue Reading

  • Oct 03 / 2017
  • Comments Off on Prisoners of War in Antiquity: The Iliad
Ancient World

Prisoners of War in Antiquity: The Iliad

“Achilles and Agamemnon” by Gottlieb Schick

 

By André Bastos Gurgel, OAB

Introduction

This is the second in a series of articles on the treatment of prisoners of war in antiquity. In this article I’ll discuss several mentions of POWs in Homer’s Iliad, analysing how the Greeks felt about POWs and the ethics behind each episode. Continue Reading