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Ancient Greek

  • Aug 10 / 2017
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Ancient Greek

Tryphiodorus and The Fall of Troy

The Burning of Troy (1759/62), oil painting by Johann Georg Trautmann

 

By André Bastos Gurgel, OAB

Introduction

I first became fascinated with the story of the Trojan War as a child. When I read the Iliad for the first time, I was intrigued by the fact that Homer never mentioned how Troy fell. I eventually realized there was a gap between the events of the Iliad and those of the Odyssey. It turns out that Homer did write about the fall of Troy, but only fragments of that text have survived. Continue Reading

  • Aug 03 / 2017
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Ancient Greek

Tragedy and the Loss of Ethics

Oedipus and Antigone by Charles Jalabert (1842)

 

By Susi Ferrarello, Ph.D.

Intro

Ethics seem like something that would be particularly helpful when you need to make a decision. In reality, ethics quite often seem to be more of a hindrance than a help. In many situations ethics may just get in the way and complicate the path to a resolution. Continue Reading

  • Jul 27 / 2017
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Ancient Greek

Plato, Phones, and That Embarrassing Silence…

Plato (left) and Aristotle (right), a detail of The School of Athens, a fresco by Raphael

 

By Susi Ferrarello, Ph.D.

Imagine Plato, the famous philosopher, and Socrates, his teacher, going out for a drink. After half an hour they are already running short of things to say (very difficult to imagine, but nevertheless let’s try) and an awkward silence descends over the conversation. Continue Reading

  • Jul 18 / 2017
  • 1
Ancient Greek

Art and Classics Series: Leonidas at Thermopylae

"Leonidas at Thermopylae" by Jacques-Louis David

 

By André Bastos Gurgel, OAB

Introduction

This article is one in a series analyzing the close link between art and the classical world and the ways in which visual art can be a tool for teaching young people about classical antiquity. This is certainly what happened to me with the painting above, “Leonidas at Thermopylae” by Jacques-Louis David . When I first saw this painting as a teenager, I decided to read Herodotus and learn more about Leonidas and his 300 Spartans. This launched me on a lifelong journey of discovery of the classical world. Continue Reading

  • Jul 06 / 2017
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Ancient Greek

Art and Classics Series: Rage of Achilles

“The Rage of Achilles” by Giovanni Battista Tiepolo

 

By André Bastos Gurgel, OAB

Introduction

This article is the first in a series exploring the links between art and classical studies. The goal is to help teachers show their students how to use works of art to develop a taste for the classical world. After all, we know that “a picture says a thousand words”, and the visual arts can be a great way to introduce students to classical mythology and history. Continue Reading

  • Jul 04 / 2017
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Ancient Greek

Art and Classics Series: Thetis and Zeus

“Jupiter and Thetis” by Jean Auguste Dominique Ingres

 

By André Bastos Gurgel, OAB

Introduction

This article is part of a series that encourages teachers to use works of art in the classroom to develop students’ taste for classical studies. After all, everybody is familiar with the proverb “a picture’s worth a thousand words”. Why not apply this to teaching the classics? With this goal in mind, I’ll be discussing one of my favorite paintings, “Thetis and Zeus” by the French artist Ingres. Continue Reading

  • Jun 27 / 2017
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Ancient Greek

Art and Classics Series: The Apotheosis of Homer

“Apotheosis of Homer” by Jean Auguste Dominique Ingres

 

By André Bastos Gurgel, OAB

Introduction

This article is part of a series intended to encourage teachers to use works of art in the classroom in order to develop students’ taste for classical studies. After all, we all know the proverb “a picture’s worth a thousand words” – a good visual can be tremendously effective in making a point, and there’s no reason not to apply this to the classics. In this article, I’ll be using one of my favorite paintings as an example, “The Apotheosis of Homer”. Continue Reading

  • Jun 08 / 2017
  • 2
Ancient Greek

The Ethics of Tragedy

Antigone in front of the dead Polynices by Nikiphoros Lytras

 

By Susi Ferrarello, Ph.D.

Do we really need tragedy in our lives? At first the answer seems ridiculously easy. No, thank you.

Yet it seems to me that only tragedy can successfully nurture our inner ethical compass and our sense of empathetic compassion for others and for ourselves. Continue Reading

  • Jun 06 / 2017
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Ancient Greek

Heinrich Schliemann: Archaeologist or Fraud?

A picture of Henirich Schliemann

 

By André Bastos Gurgel, OAB

Introduction

Most Classics teachers and students have heard of the German archeologist Heinrich Schliemann and many see him as a great scholar who set an example for generations to come. Still, his reputation has been under attack for years, and many people now believe he was nothing but a fraud. In this article I’ll be discussing Schliemann and the controversy that surrounds him. Continue Reading