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Ancient Greek

  • Jul 18 / 2017
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Ancient Greek

Art and Classics Series: Leonidas at Thermopylae

"Leonidas at Thermopylae" by Jacques-Louis David

 

By André Bastos Gurgel, OAB

Introduction

This article is one in a series analyzing the close link between art and the classical world and the ways in which visual art can be a tool for teaching young people about classical antiquity. This is certainly what happened to me with the painting above, “Leonidas at Thermopylae” by Jacques-Louis David . When I first saw this painting as a teenager, I decided to read Herodotus and learn more about Leonidas and his 300 Spartans. This launched me on a lifelong journey of discovery of the classical world. Continue Reading

  • Jul 06 / 2017
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Ancient Greek

Art and Classics Series: Rage of Achilles

“The Rage of Achilles” by Giovanni Battista Tiepolo

 

By André Bastos Gurgel, OAB

Introduction

This article is the first in a series exploring the links between art and classical studies. The goal is to help teachers show their students how to use works of art to develop a taste for the classical world. After all, we know that “a picture says a thousand words”, and the visual arts can be a great way to introduce students to classical mythology and history. Continue Reading

  • Jul 04 / 2017
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Ancient Greek

Art and Classics Series: Thetis and Zeus

“Jupiter and Thetis” by Jean Auguste Dominique Ingres

 

By André Bastos Gurgel, OAB

Introduction

This article is part of a series that encourages teachers to use works of art in the classroom to develop students’ taste for classical studies. After all, everybody is familiar with the proverb “a picture’s worth a thousand words”. Why not apply this to teaching the classics? With this goal in mind, I’ll be discussing one of my favorite paintings, “Thetis and Zeus” by the French artist Ingres. Continue Reading

  • Jun 27 / 2017
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Ancient Greek

Art and Classics Series: The Apotheosis of Homer

“Apotheosis of Homer” by Jean Auguste Dominique Ingres

 

By André Bastos Gurgel, OAB

Introduction

This article is part of a series intended to encourage teachers to use works of art in the classroom in order to develop students’ taste for classical studies. After all, we all know the proverb “a picture’s worth a thousand words” – a good visual can be tremendously effective in making a point, and there’s no reason not to apply this to the classics. In this article, I’ll be using one of my favorite paintings as an example, “The Apotheosis of Homer”. Continue Reading

  • Jun 08 / 2017
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Ancient Greek

The Ethics of Tragedy

Antigone in front of the dead Polynices by Nikiphoros Lytras

 

By Susi Ferrarello, Ph.D.

Do we really need tragedy in our lives? At first the answer seems ridiculously easy. No, thank you.

Yet it seems to me that only tragedy can successfully nurture our inner ethical compass and our sense of empathetic compassion for others and for ourselves. Continue Reading

  • Jun 06 / 2017
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Ancient Greek

Heinrich Schliemann: Archaeologist or Fraud?

A picture of Henirich Schliemann

 

By André Bastos Gurgel, OAB

Introduction

Most Classics teachers and students have heard of the German archeologist Heinrich Schliemann and many see him as a great scholar who set an example for generations to come. Still, his reputation has been under attack for years, and many people now believe he was nothing but a fraud. In this article I’ll be discussing Schliemann and the controversy that surrounds him. Continue Reading

  • May 30 / 2017
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Ancient Greek

The Bibliotheka: a Compendium of Greek Mythology

Capturing the Erymanthian Boar

 

By André Bastos Gurgel, OAB

Introduction

I first became interested in classics as a child when I heard the great tales of Greek mythology, stories like the Trojan War, the labors of Heracles, and the Minotaur. Exposure to these fascinating legends in childhood increases the chances that the child will one day become an enthusiast of classical literature or even a classicist. However, one thing has always puzzled me: what is our source of all these stories? How do we know about them? Continue Reading

  • May 09 / 2017
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Ancient Greek

Crimes and Murders: the Tragedy of Agamemnon’s Family

The Mask of Agamemnon which was discovered by Heinrich Schliemann in 1876 at Mycenae

 

By André Bastos Gurgel, OAB

Introduction

Every student of the classics is no doubt familiar with the Greek hero Agamemnon, who commanded the Greek expedition against the Trojans and was murdered by his wife, Clytemnestra. But are you aware of the dark side of this famous character? Sources such as the Bibliotheca by Pseudo-Apollodorus and Greek playwrights like Euripides mention hideous crimes committed by Agamemnon and his ancestors, including murder, treachery and cannibalism. The stories I’m about to tell you are so risqué that Homer considered them too hot for the Iliad! Continue Reading

  • Apr 25 / 2017
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Ancient Greek

The Best Textbooks for Homeric Greek Students

A Reading from Homer by Lawrence Alma Tadema

 

By André Bastos Gurgel, OAB

Homer is one of the greatest authors of world literature. His epic poems have always been considered masterpieces and students will benefit greatly from access to these works in the original Ancient Greek. Reading Homer, however, is not an easy task. That’s why a number of books have been written specifically for the Homeric Greek student. In this article I list what I consider to be the best books for Homeric Greek students. Continue Reading