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Ancient World

  • Feb 22 / 2018
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Ancient World

Enemies of Rome: the Gauls

The Gauls in Rome

 

By André Bastos Gurgel, OAB

In this series of articles I’ll be shining a light on Rome’s greatest enemies. Over the centuries the Romans fought wars against a variety of peoples who refused to be integrated into the Roman world. Today’s article is about the Gauls. Continue Reading

  • Feb 16 / 2018
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Ancient World

Carmenta Classical Interview: Athena

Bust of Athena

 

By André Bastos Gurgel, OAB

I’m having a great time here in Olympus! After interviewing Zeus, I thought I should interview someone else from his family, and imagine my surprise when the next moment I spotted a goddess in armor playing with an owl, Zeus’ daughter Athena! Continue Reading

  • Feb 14 / 2018
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Ancient World

From Lupercalia to Carnival: The February Festivals

“The Lupercalian Festival in Rome”, drawing by the circle of Adam Elsheimer

 

By André Bastos Gurgel, OAB

Ancient civilizations had various festivals throughout the year. Such events were usually aimed at pleasing the gods, perhap to obtain a good harvest or just to celebrate the birth of a god. Even today, these celebrations survive in the form of holidays like Mardi Gras and Carnival. The festivals held by the Romans in the month of Februarius (February) were very different from these modern festivities, but there are still similarities. Continue Reading

  • Feb 01 / 2018
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Ancient World

Classical Interviews: Zeus

Statue of Zeus, Louvre Museum

 

By André Bastos Gurgel, OAB

A funny thing happened when I met Archimedes. Before interviewing the Syracusan genius, he suggested taking me on a tour to see all his amazing inventions built to ward off the Romans from his beloved homeland. When I saw a catapult, I asked him to show me how it worked, but I wasn’t expecting him to actually cut the rope and throw me many stadia away! Continue Reading

  • Jan 11 / 2018
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Ancient World

Spartacus: the Man and the Myth

Spartacus sculpture, Louvre Museum

 

By André Bastos Gurgel, OAB

When one thinks of Spartacus, the first words that come to mind are “freedom fighter”, “revolutionary”, “selfless hero”, etc. But in reality these appellations would be more appropriate to describe Spartacus the myth rather than the real historical character who led the famous slave rebellion known as the Third Servile War. Continue Reading

  • Jan 09 / 2018
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Ancient World

Classical Interviews: Augustus (In Latin!)

Bust of Augustus

 

By André Bastos Gurgel, OAB

Q: Ave, Auguste. Gratias ago! Mihi gaudio est tecum colloqui, o pater patriae. Quid de tuo regno novo nobis dicere potes?

(Ave, Auguste. Thanks for receiving us so soon. It’s a great pleasure to interview you, o father of the homeland. What can you tell us about your new life as a ruler?) Continue Reading

  • Jan 05 / 2018
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Ancient World

Tears and Perfume

“Myrrha and Cinyras” by Virgil Solis

 

By Susi Ferrarello, Ph.D.

Tears and Shame

“I cried so much that I feel empty inside. I’m tired of all these tears. They weigh like rocks upon my cheeks,” a client of mine said to me. Continue Reading

  • Dec 29 / 2017
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Ancient World

Scholars and Warriors: Cao Cao

Screen shot from “Cao Cao's War Poem”

 

By André Bastos Gurgel, OAB

This series, which we are calling “Scholars and Warriors”, hopes to challenge a modern-day stereotype: the idea that a man must either like poetry and literature or be interested in sports or fighting, never both. Men who like poetry are too often seen as effeminate or weak, and the ones who like sports or martial arts are seen as brainless hooligans. People today often don’t realize that it’s possible to like both, even though in earlier periods these things often went hand in hand. Continue Reading

  • Dec 21 / 2017
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Ancient World

A Myth from the Icelandic Sagas Becomes Reality!

“The Mountain” from Game of Thrones

 

By André Bastos Gurgel, OAB

In the modern age we often hear about deeds performed by our ancestors which we, as rational human beings, attribute to legend. Americans must have heard about the deeds of the pilgrim Daniel Boone who, legend says, was able to cut down trees with his bare hands. On the other hand, what happens when we see one of those myths becomereality before our own eyes? Continue Reading

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