:::: MENU ::::

Classical Literature

  • Jan 17 / 2017
  • 0
Classical Literature

Scottish Gaelic: Poetry in the Highlands

MacIan print of Highlanders wearing kilts and plaids separately

 

By André Bastos Gurgel, OAB and John Priest, B.A Cert. Min

Scottish Gaelic is a direct descendent of an early medieval language, Old Irish, and has produced amazing literature with beautiful poems which are sometimes even set to music. Nevertheless, too many Scots still ignore this treasure of their culture or even think that there is no Scottish poetic tradition in any other language but Lowland Scots, which is related to English. In this article we have selected a few wonderful pieces of poetry produced by natives of the Scottish Highlands. Continue Reading

  • Jan 12 / 2017
  • 0
Classical Literature

Overlooked Literature: Chinese Literature

 

By André Bastos Gurgel, OAB

China has produced real treasures of literature, from works of poetry to those of romance and history. However, this 5000-year-old genre is often overlooked; consequently, there are very few college departments dedicated to Chinese literature. For this reason, we at Carmenta Latin School believe it is time to make the general public more familiar with China’s great literary tradition. We have, therefore, selected three major works produced by this tremendous civilization. Continue Reading

  • Jan 10 / 2017
  • 0
Classical Literature

Overlooked Literature: Anglo-Saxon

Beowulf: king Geats

 

By André Bastos Gurgel, OAB

Today we’re going to look at some of the great literature produced by the Anglo-Saxons, the people whose language gave birth to Middle and Modern English. Although it is spoken by billions around the world, most people don’t realize that English comes from Anglo-Saxon or Old English. There are some marvelous pieces of Old English literature including an epic poem, historiography, and wisdom literature. Continue Reading

  • Dec 22 / 2016
  • 0
Classical Literature

Polymaths: Sir Richard Francis Burton

Sir Richard Francis Burton

 

By André Bastos Gurgel, OAB

Today we’ll be talking about Sir Richard Francis Burton, one of the greatest polymaths of the nineteenth century. The word polymath comes from the Greek πολυμαθής (“knowing much”) and refers to a person whose expertise spans a significant number of different subject areas. Continue Reading

  • Dec 15 / 2016
  • 0
Classical Literature

Overlooked Literature: The Great Celtic Literary Tradition

Ireland old map. Created by John Tallis, published on Illustrated Atlas, London 1851

 

By André Bastos Gurgel, OAB and John Priest, BA, Cert. Min.

Few people realize that the Irish produced great literary works that, in our humble opinion, are as good as their Roman and ancient Greek counterparts. Consequently, it is difficult to find scholars who truly appreciate this kind of literature. This is manifest in the fact that there are very few institutions of higher learning outside of Ireland that allow for its study. We at Carmenta Latin School, however, feel that such literary tradition should not be be overlooked. Continue Reading

  • Nov 17 / 2016
  • 0
Classical Literature

Overlooked Literature Series – SANSKRIT

The classical literature of India written in the Sanskrit language

 

By André Bastos Gurgel, OAB

There are many classical languages that have contributed a great deal to world literature. However, many of these great works have been neglected for many years. They are rarely translated, and publishers do not seem to be interested in promoting the ideas of men who lived a thousand years ago in some of the more obscure parts of the planet. Continue Reading

  • Aug 15 / 2014
  • 0
Classical Literature

Ovid’s Poetic Style in the Amores (A Critical Analysis)

Publius Ovidius Naso Ovid in the Nuremberg Chronicle

 

by Rebecca Gove, M.A.T.

Ovid is constantly drawing our attention to his poetic style; in fact, he seems to lavish in the fact that his style is so different from the other elegists of the Augustan Age. He offers a primarily dactylic meter, which he appears to favor in Poem 1.1 and must write elegy only when Cupid steals away a foot from every other line. Continue Reading

  • Aug 06 / 2014
  • 0
Classical Literature

An Original Letter from Lucretia to Sextus Tarquinius (A Reflection on Ovid’s Heroides)

The Rape of Lucretia, with Sextus Taquinius  (Ovid's Heroides)

 

by Rebecca Gove, M.A.T.

Latin Elegiac poetry has always been a particular fascination of mine: Horace, Catullus, Propertius…all stunning poets who created literary gold with the help of their Muses. But one poet always held my fancy more than others: Publius Ovidius Naso, who wrote perhaps one of the most creative and unique collections of elegiac couplets that are extant today: the Heroides. 16 fictional letters (some scholars attribute 21, but this is controversial) from Greek and Roman mythological women to their absent lovers depict every variation of the classic “Dear John” letter and every emotion of a great soap opera: passion, betrayal, scorn, envy, confusion, rage, and more. If you have never had the pleasure of reading Ovid’s Heroides, I highly recommend a few of the following texts on Amazon: Continue Reading

Pages:12