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  • May 25 / 2017
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Latin

Learning Latin with Publilius Syrus

Publilius Syrus

 

By André Bastos Gurgel, OAB

Introduction

Although proverbs and maxims are by their nature very brief, they can contain a tremendous amount of wisdom. And in my mind one of the wisest writers of proverbs was Publilius Syrus! His writing has provided many generations with precious life lessons, and I therefore have no doubt that this present generation of Latin students is no different. In this article, as a means of introduction for those not yet familiar with his work, I have selected three sample proverbs of his. Continue Reading

  • May 23 / 2017
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Latin

Res Gestae Divi Augusti: An Emperor’s Autobiography

Caesar Augustus bust

 

By André Bastos Gurgel, OAB

Introduction

Have you heard of Augustus Caesar? What a silly question! Of course you have. But did you know that he wrote a first-person account of his own life? That’s right! Augustus left the text in his will, instructing the Senate to engrave the text on a pair of bronze pillars in front of his mausoleum. In this article I will be discussing three excerpts from the Res Gestae and explaining why I think this text is so great for intermediate Latin students. Continue Reading

  • May 11 / 2017
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Latin

Historia Brittonum: a Forgotten Latin Work

The Sleep of King Arthur in Avalon by Edward Coley Burne-Jones

 

By André Bastos Gurgel, OAB

Introduction

Have you ever heard of the Historia Brittonum? I hadn’t either, until a few months ago, when I stumbled on this amazing historical chronicle during a search for sources on King Arthur. In fact, most scholars believe that this text is the original source for later Arthurian literature. In this article I’ll do my best to explain why this is an essential text for any serious student of Latin or medieval history. Continue Reading

  • May 04 / 2017
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Latin

Teaching Latin with Children’s Books – Part II

Harry Potter books in Latin

 

By André Bastos Gurgel, OAB

I believe that the sooner children start to learn Latin, the better, and one of the best ways to boost their reading skills and get them excited about the language is to introduce them to Latin translations of children’s classics. Since many people responded positively to the first article I wrote on this subject, I decided to write a sequel. I’ll be describing and recommending three children’s books that are now available in the language of Cicero. Continue Reading

  • May 02 / 2017
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Latin

Studies in Latin Morphology, Part VII: Defective Degree Adjectives

Detail of Pantheon, Rome

 

By Kostas Petropoulos, M.A.

Some Latin adjectives are distinguished by what may be termed defective degrees. It is important to note that these are not the irregular comparisons of bonus/melior/optimus or the like; they are simply lacking in one of the degrees of comparison, yet are often otherwise regular. They may be categorized as follows: Continue Reading

  • Apr 27 / 2017
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Latin

Learning Latin with Odo of Cheriton

The Stork and the Wolf fable

 

By André Bastos Gurgel, OAB

Have you heard of the writer Odo of Cheriton? No? I hadn’t either. In fact, I discovered him by chance during a search for medieval fabulists. Medieval Latin has many literary treasures that, sadly, have been overlooked, and this is clearly the case with Odo of Cheriton. With this in mind, I’ve decided to write an article about his life and works and explain why I think his fables are useful for Latin students. Continue Reading

  • Apr 20 / 2017
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Latin

Tips for Latin Teachers: Phaedrus and His Fables

The Best Fables by Phaedrus

 

By André Bastos Gurgel, OAB

Despite what many people think, fables are not aimed exclusively at children; in fact the ancients cherished them as valuable moral tales for all ages, and we see examples of this genre in many different civilizations. Fables were thought to be highly relevant as sources of wisdom and important in shaping character. Continue Reading

  • Apr 13 / 2017
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Latin

Learning Latin with Catullus

“Catullus at Lesbia's” by Lawrence Alma-Tadema

 

By André Bastos Gurgel, OAB

Catullus is one of the greatest, most well-known Latin poets. His poetry is certainly no piece of cake, however. In this article I hope to offer teachers some guidelines on how to introduce students to the works of this Roman writer and suggest which poems they should read first. Continue Reading

  • Apr 11 / 2017
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Latin

Teaching Latin with Children’s Books

Dr. Seuss in Latin

 

By André Bastos Gurgel, OAB

Many people aren’t aware of how many classics of children’s literature have been translated into Latin. In this post I will talk about three such works which teachers can use to help students learn Latin more quickly while having more fun. Continue Reading

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