:::: MENU ::::

Carmenta Online Blog

  • Apr 20 / 2017
  • 0
Latin

Tips for Latin Teachers: Phaedrus and His Fables

The Best Fables by Phaedrus

 

By André Bastos Gurgel, OAB

Despite what many people think, fables are not aimed exclusively at children; in fact the ancients cherished them as valuable moral tales for all ages, and we see examples of this genre in many different civilizations. Fables were thought to be highly relevant as sources of wisdom and important in shaping character. Continue Reading

  • Apr 18 / 2017
  • 0
Classical Literature

How 20th-Century Lawyers Sued Jonathan Swift

Gulliver Exhibited to the Brobdingnag Farmer (painting by Richard Redgrave)

 

By André Bastos Gurgel, OAB

The title of this article may sound bizarre. How could Jonathan Swift possibly be sued nowadays? Let me explain how! I corresponded for over ten years with a Brazilian journalist named Janer Cristaldo. Although he held two degrees in law and philosophy plus a Ph.D. in literature from the Sorbonne, he worked his whole life as a journalist as writing was his real passion. He once wrote an article about an event that took place during his early years as a law student, when he published an excerpt from Gulliver’s Travels in his school’s journal. Believe it or not, Jonathan Swift was subsequently sued by both the Order of Brazilian Lawyers and the Association of Magistrates! Continue Reading

  • Apr 13 / 2017
  • 0
Latin

Learning Latin with Catullus

“Catullus at Lesbia's” by Lawrence Alma-Tadema

 

By André Bastos Gurgel, OAB

Catullus is one of the greatest, most well-known Latin poets. His poetry is certainly no piece of cake, however. In this article I hope to offer teachers some guidelines on how to introduce students to the works of this Roman writer and suggest which poems they should read first. Continue Reading

  • Apr 11 / 2017
  • 1
Latin

Teaching Latin with Children’s Books

Dr. Seuss in Latin

 

By André Bastos Gurgel, OAB

Many people aren’t aware of how many classics of children’s literature have been translated into Latin. In this post I will talk about three such works which teachers can use to help students learn Latin more quickly while having more fun. Continue Reading

  • Apr 04 / 2017
  • 0
Latin

Isidore of Seville: the Perfect Introduction to Latin Prose

Statue of Isidore of Seville (c.560–636) at the entrance staircase of the National Library of Spain, in Madrid

 

By André Bastos Gurgel, OAB

Many Latin works from the Middle Ages tend to be overlooked by scholars. I believe it’s time to change this. In that vein, today I’ll be talking about Isidore of Seville, whose works can be a great way to introduce students to Latin prose. In this article I hope to make Latin teachers and students more familiar with the work of this great writer. Continue Reading

  • Mar 30 / 2017
  • 0
Latin

Learning Latin with Apicius: a Delicious Experience

The Apicius manuscript (ca. 900 AD) from the monastery of Fulda in Germany, which was acquired in 1929 by the New York Academy of Medicine

 

By André Bastos Gurgel, OAB

Most people don’t realize how fond of food the Romans were. Authors like Suetonius, Tacitus, and Eutropius made detailed descriptions of banquets in which a huge variety of fowl, meat, and fish were served. According to legend, the Romans would bring a feather and use it to scratch their throats in order to vomit so they could start eating again! Continue Reading

  • Mar 28 / 2017
  • 0
Latin

Tips for Latin Teachers: Humorous Anecdotes from Classical Antiquity

Illustration to La Fontaine's Fables, To Bell the Cat by Gustave Doré

 

By André Bastos Gurgel, OAB

I believe teachers should try to develop a sense of discipline in their students, preparing them for the task of learning complex Latin grammar. Still, telling funny stories and anecdotes from classical times can be very positive for students as well. Most people see classics as a collection of boring tales about uninteresting people who died thousands of years ago, so it´s up to teachers to help them realize that the ancients had a sense of humor. Continue Reading

  • Mar 23 / 2017
  • 0
Latin

Teaching Latin with Eutropius

Eutropius: Breviarium ab urbe condita

 

By André Bastos Gurgel, OAB

Eutropius was a Roman historian whose Breviarium ab Urbe Condita was read by Latin students throughout the Middle Ages. Some scholars today think that his style does not belong to classical Latin and, therefore, see him as a minor historian. What they neglect to realize in so doing is that he is a perfect option for Latin students, as his simple, straightforward style can be understood even by the intermediate student. Continue Reading

  • Mar 21 / 2017
  • 0
Latin

Teaching the Aeneid with the Help of Servius

Aeneas Flees Burning Troy, Federico Barocci, 1598

 

By André Bastos Gurgel, OAB

Vergil’s Aeneid is one of the most difficult classical texts ever written because of its complex word order, innumerable references to Roman history and mythology, and huge quantity of vocabulary. Even in classical times, people must have found it difficult to read. Looking to help, a learned grammarian named Servius wrote a commented edition with the intention of making Vergil’s work easier for students. In this article I will show why this Latin writer can be the key to making the Aeneid easier for advanced Latin students. Continue Reading

Pages:1234567...35