:::: MENU ::::

Carmenta Online Blog

  • Feb 21 / 2017
  • 0
Latin

Want to Make Students Love the Classics? Teach Them Mythology!

“Odysseus and the Sirens” by Herbert James Draper

 

By André Bastos Gurgel, OAB

Young people often think that the classics are useless. That’s why classics teachers need to adopt strategies to develop an unquenchable love for Latin and Ancient Greek in their students. One of the best strategies is to teach them mythology. Certain tales can have a strong influence on young people, helping them develop a lifelong love of the classics. Continue Reading

  • Feb 16 / 2017
  • 0
Ancient Greek

Three Great Polymaths: Aristotle, Michelangelo, and Burton

Aristotle, marble portrait bust, Roman copy (2nd century bc) of a Greek original (c. 325 bc); in the Museo Nazionale Romano, Rome

 

By André Bastos Gurgel, OAB

The term “polymath” comes from the Ancient Greek πολυμαθής (“having learned much”) and refers to an individual who has achieved expertise in a significant number of subjects. This article will mention three names from three different periods of history and talk a bit about their greatest accomplishments. They were considered geniuses and their contributions to the world should never be forgotten. Continue Reading

  • Feb 07 / 2017
  • 0
Latin

Teaching Latin with Music: Some Advice for Teachers

Detail of “The Parnassus” by Raphael in the Raphael Rooms

 

By André Bastos Gurgel, OAB

Most teachers agree that music can be an amazing tool in helping students learn a new language. When students hear a song they like, their brains start producing hormones related to pleasure. This in turn allows them to achieve fluency much faster. Therefore, if this method has been proven useful to teach modern languages, why not use it to teach Latin? In this article, I will suggest a few songs teachers can use with their students to make their jobs a lot easier. Continue Reading

  • Feb 02 / 2017
  • 0
Ancient Greek

Alcestis and Admetus: Hoping to Rise Again

The Farewell of Admetus and Alcestis. Etruscan red-figure amphora found in Vulci

 

By Susi Ferrarello, Ph.D.

Let’s talk about marriage.

How often does it happen that partners decide to put the couple before themselves as individuals? How often does one or even both of them willingly decide to “die”, metaphorically speaking, for a higher good in their relationship? It might be for the sake of their children, or the status quo, or for the sake of an uncertain future. Continue Reading

  • Jan 31 / 2017
  • 0
Latin

Tips for Latin Teachers: Roman Proverbs for Students

"Carpe Diem" (Seize the Day) Plaque by Piazza Pisano

 

By André Bastos Gurgel, OAB

The ancients were very fond of proverbs. The Greeks, Romans, Japanese, and Chinese all knew the immense amount of wisdom contained within these short, profound sayings. In this article we’ll look at some of the most memorable proverbs produced by the Romans and why Latin teachers should familiarize their students with them. Continue Reading

  • Jan 26 / 2017
  • 0
Latin

Tips for Advanced Latin Students

Carmenta tutor with his student

 

By André Bastos Gurgel, OAB

Latin teachers seem to agree that students usually take three or four years to master Latin grammar. Once the student has done this, it’s time to start reading the classics, but the question is which author to read first. In this article we propose several texts and explain why they are a good option for advanced Latin students. Continue Reading

  • Jan 24 / 2017
  • 0
Ancient World

Comparative Mythology: Cosmic Wars

Zeus and Thetis by Jean Auguste Dominique Ingres (1780-1867)

 

By André Bastos Gurgel, OAB

Comparative mythology is the fascinating examination of myths from different cultures. One of the best aspects of analyzing the ancient Greeks, Hindus, and Nordic peoples is that they have many legends in common. Today we will discuss a myth which is present in three different cultures: cosmic wars! Continue Reading

  • Jan 19 / 2017
  • 0
Latin

Fabricius: Fair Play Even in Times of War

Pyrrhus of Epirus

 

By André Bastos Gurgel, OAB

We are all familiar with the saying “all is fair in love and war.” History, however, shows us that the Romans would not agree with this–at least not the war part. Today we’ll be talking about a Roman commander who refused to participate in a plot which would have killed his opponent in a cowardly manner. Continue Reading

Pages:1234567...33