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  • Aug 17 / 2017
  • Comments Off on Symphosius’ Aenigmata: Latin Riddles for Students!
Latin

Symphosius’ Aenigmata: Latin Riddles for Students!

This painting on the base of an ancient cup shows Oedipus and the Sphinx, a winged monster with the body of a lion and the head of a woman. To rescue the people of Thebes from the monster's terror, Oedipus had to answer its riddle

 

By André Bastos Gurgel, OAB

Have you heard of the Latin riddle-writer Symphosius? I hadn’t either until a few months ago when, during a search for Anglo-Saxon riddles, I stumbled on his “Aenigmata”, a collection of riddles written in the language of Cicero. Continue Reading

  • Aug 10 / 2017
  • Comments Off on Tryphiodorus and The Fall of Troy
Ancient Greek

Tryphiodorus and The Fall of Troy

The Burning of Troy (1759/62), oil painting by Johann Georg Trautmann

 

By André Bastos Gurgel, OAB

Introduction

I first became fascinated with the story of the Trojan War as a child. When I read the Iliad for the first time, I was intrigued by the fact that Homer never mentioned how Troy fell. I eventually realized there was a gap between the events of the Iliad and those of the Odyssey. It turns out that Homer did write about the fall of Troy, but only fragments of that text have survived. Continue Reading

  • Aug 08 / 2017
  • Comments Off on Learning Latin with Asterix
Latin

Learning Latin with Asterix

“Asterix the Gaul” in Latin

 

By André Bastos Gurgel, OAB

Introduction

This is the first article in a series about the Asterix comic books, written by René Goscinny and illustrated by Albert Uderzo, which have also been translated into Latin. I first read the Asterix books when I was ten years old, and the collection was instrumental in helping me develop a taste for classics, with its many allusions to classical culture and education. Continue Reading

  • Aug 03 / 2017
  • Comments Off on Tragedy and the Loss of Ethics
Ancient Greek

Tragedy and the Loss of Ethics

Oedipus and Antigone by Charles Jalabert (1842)

 

By Susi Ferrarello, Ph.D.

Intro

Ethics seem like something that would be particularly helpful when you need to make a decision. In reality, ethics quite often seem to be more of a hindrance than a help. In many situations ethics may just get in the way and complicate the path to a resolution. Continue Reading

  • Aug 01 / 2017
  • Comments Off on Classical Interviews: Julius Caesar
Latin

Classical Interviews: Julius Caesar

Vercingetorix throws down his arms at the feet of Julius Caesar. Painting by Lionel Royer.

 

By André Bastos Gurgel, OAB

This is the first of a series of fictitious interviews with important characters of the ancient Roman and Greek worlds. The idea of made-up interviews first appeared in the writings of the Italian writer Giuseppe Papini, though he ‘interviewed’ people from more recent times. Today’s interview is with Caius Julius Caesar who gladly received me at his domus in Rome. I asked him about his future plans as Rome’s dictator. Continue Reading

  • Jul 27 / 2017
  • Comments Off on Plato, Phones, and That Embarrassing Silence…
Ancient Greek

Plato, Phones, and That Embarrassing Silence…

Plato (left) and Aristotle (right), a detail of The School of Athens, a fresco by Raphael

 

By Susi Ferrarello, Ph.D.

Imagine Plato, the famous philosopher, and Socrates, his teacher, going out for a drink. After half an hour they are already running short of things to say (very difficult to imagine, but nevertheless let’s try) and an awkward silence descends over the conversation. Continue Reading

  • Jul 25 / 2017
  • Comments Off on Homework Suggestion: the Achilleid
Latin

Homework Suggestion: the Achilleid

Chiron teaching Achilles how to play the lyre, a Roman fresco from Herculaneum, 1st century AD

 

By André Bastos Gurgel, OAB

Introduction

Have you read the Latin epic poem the Achilleid? No? Well, neither had I until I bought a dictionary of mythology that happened to mention this overlooked work by the Roman writer Publius Papinius Statius. But after taking a look, it quickly became clear to me that this would make a great homework assignment for Latin students! Continue Reading

  • Jul 20 / 2017
  • Comments Off on The Oral Literature of the Apache, Lushootseed, and Arapaho Tribes
Classical Literature

The Oral Literature of the Apache, Lushootseed, and Arapaho Tribes

Native American Family

 

By André Bastos Gurgel, OAB and Erik Ogle, M.A.

Introduction

Though mostly in oral form, Native Americans have produced some real literary treasures that have been passed down by word-of-mouth for thousands of years. In the following article I’ll be discussing three Native American tribes and their most famous examples of oral poetry. Continue Reading

  • Jul 20 / 2017
  • Comments Off on How to Solve a Basic Algebraic Equation
Education

How to Solve a Basic Algebraic Equation

How to solve a basic Algebraic equation

 

By Andrew Kuhry-Haeuser, Carmenta Founder

1) The #1 rule to remember is that, no matter what, any operation you apply to one side of the equals sign must be applied to the other side of the equals sign, whether it’s addition, subtraction, multiplication, division, exponents, or roots. Continue Reading

  • Jul 18 / 2017
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Ancient Greek

Art and Classics Series: Leonidas at Thermopylae

"Leonidas at Thermopylae" by Jacques-Louis David

 

By André Bastos Gurgel, OAB

Introduction

This article is one in a series analyzing the close link between art and the classical world and the ways in which visual art can be a tool for teaching young people about classical antiquity. This is certainly what happened to me with the painting above, “Leonidas at Thermopylae” by Jacques-Louis David . When I first saw this painting as a teenager, I decided to read Herodotus and learn more about Leonidas and his 300 Spartans. This launched me on a lifelong journey of discovery of the classical world. Continue Reading

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