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  • Oct 17 / 2017
  • Comments Off on The Chinese Trojan Horse
Ancient World

The Chinese Trojan Horse

China's Terracotta Warriors

 

By André Bastos Gurgel, OAB

Introduction

Today I would like to share a story which I heard from my Chinese tutor: the tale of Gou Jian and the Chinese Trojan Horse. Continue Reading

  • Oct 12 / 2017
  • Comments Off on Classical Interviews: Emperor Claudius
Ancient World

Classical Interviews: Emperor Claudius

Bust of Emperor Claudius

 

By André Bastos Gurgel, OAB

I got the idea for these made-up interviews from the novel “Grog” by the Italian writer Giuseppe Papini, though his “interviews” were with people a bit more contemporary. Today’s interview is with Rome’s fourth emperor, Claudius, who welcomed me at his palace. Although many historians accuse him of being weak and stupid, it was obvious to me that the man I was interviewing was a wise scholar. Continue Reading

  • Oct 10 / 2017
  • Comments Off on Carmenta Film Review: 300 Spartans: A Greek Tragedy of a Movie! ★☆☆☆☆
Book, Film, and TV Reviews

Carmenta Film Review: 300 Spartans: A Greek Tragedy of a Movie! ★☆☆☆☆

Poster Artwork of the“300” movie

 

By André Bastos Gurgel, OAB

Introduction

This is part of a series of articles about classics-related books and movies. Today I will review the movie “300”, based on the historical Battle of Thermopylae in 480 BC, when three hundred Spartans held back a huge Persian army for three days. I really loved the 1962 movie adaptation of these events, Rudolph Maté’s “The 300 Spartans”version, but was very disappointed in this new version, so disappointed that I have given it only one star. Here’s why… Continue Reading

  • Oct 05 / 2017
  • Comments Off on The Banning of Shakespeare in English Schools
English

The Banning of Shakespeare in English Schools

Shakespeare’s portrait

 

By André Bastos Gurgel, OAB and John Priest, B.A Cert. Min

Introduction

If you liked my article on the novel Fahrenheit 451, you will probably enjoy today’s story about an instance in which Ray Bradbury’s prophecy came true. Bradbury’s book describes a dystopian society where reading books is forbidden. It may sound too fantastic to come true, but something like it happened in 2009 when the English authorities removed the obligation to study Shakespeare’s works from public school curricula. Continue Reading

  • Oct 03 / 2017
  • Comments Off on Prisoners of War in Antiquity: The Iliad
Ancient World

Prisoners of War in Antiquity: The Iliad

“Achilles and Agamemnon” by Gottlieb Schick

 

By André Bastos Gurgel, OAB

Introduction

This is the second in a series of articles on the treatment of prisoners of war in antiquity. In this article I’ll discuss several mentions of POWs in Homer’s Iliad, analysing how the Greeks felt about POWs and the ethics behind each episode. Continue Reading

  • Sep 28 / 2017
  • Comments Off on Classical Architecture at the National Arboretum
Ancient World

Classical Architecture at the National Arboretum

Picture of the National Arboretum

 

By Neda Helena Jeny, Ph.D.

Once again, my blog will be about Washington, where once again I spent a few days sightseeing. When I arrived there in July, the first place I visited was the National Gallery; I trusted that there would be, as ever, some fascinating temporary exhibition. And there was—about eighteenth-century French paintings in the United States. Who would have thought that Joseph Bonaparte, the elder brother of Napoleon and sometime king of Spain, was instrumental in introducing French art to America once he lost his throne and came to New England? I enjoyed the exhibition, as I enjoyed returning to the old sights I know so well—but now I will speak of something else. Continue Reading

  • Sep 26 / 2017
  • Comments Off on Classical Interviews: Catullus
Ancient World

Classical Interviews: Catullus

Modern bust of Catullus

 

This series of fictitious interviews is based on the Italian writer Papini’s novel Gog. In it, the main character interviews contemporary celebrities, like Freud and Einstein. In this series I’ve done the same thing, but with well-known personalities from the ancient Greek and Roman world. Continue Reading

  • Sep 21 / 2017
  • Comments Off on Classical Interviews: Phaedrus the Fabulist
Ancient World

Classical Interviews: Phaedrus the Fabulist

Phaedrus, a fable writer

 

By André Bastos Gurgel, OAB

This article is one of a series of fictitious interviews with important figures from the ancient Roman and Greek worlds. The concept of made-up interviews first appeared in the writings of the Italian novelist Giuseppe Papini, though he “interviewed” people from more recent times. Today’s interview is with a man who once was a slave, but his talent for writing was so great that his master granted him his freedom. He was a fable writer living during the reign of Augustus, and in my opinion, his stories will live forever. That’s right…I’m talking about Phaedrus! Continue Reading

  • Sep 19 / 2017
  • Comments Off on Latin Translation of the Bhagavad Gita
Latin

Latin Translation of the Bhagavad Gita

Bhagavad Gita, a 19th-century manuscript

 

By André Bastos Gurgel, OAB

Introduction

The Bhagavad Gita is one of the greatest jewels of world literature. Aldous Huxley said, “The Bhagavad-Gita is the most systematic statement of spiritual evolution of endowing value to mankind. It is one of the most clear and comprehensive summaries of perennial philosophy ever revealed; hence its enduring value is subject not only to India but to all of humanity”. Continue Reading

  • Sep 14 / 2017
  • Comments Off on Classical Interviews: Caligula
Ancient World

Classical Interviews: Caligula

Bust of Caligula

 

By André Bastos Gurgel, OAB

This series of fictitious interviews is based on the Italian writer Papini’s novel Gog. In it, the main character interviews contemporary celebrities, like Freud and Einstein. In this series I’ve done the same, but with well-known personalities from the ancient Greek and Roman world. Continue Reading

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