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  • Aug 06 / 2014
  • Comments Off on An Original Letter from Lucretia to Sextus Tarquinius (A Reflection on Ovid’s Heroides)
Classical Literature

An Original Letter from Lucretia to Sextus Tarquinius (A Reflection on Ovid’s Heroides)

The Rape of Lucretia, with Sextus Taquinius  (Ovid's Heroides)

 

by Rebecca Gove, M.A.T.

Latin Elegiac poetry has always been a particular fascination of mine: Horace, Catullus, Propertius…all stunning poets who created literary gold with the help of their Muses. But one poet always held my fancy more than others: Publius Ovidius Naso, who wrote perhaps one of the most creative and unique collections of elegiac couplets that are extant today: the Heroides. 16 fictional letters (some scholars attribute 21, but this is controversial) from Greek and Roman mythological women to their absent lovers depict every variation of the classic “Dear John” letter and every emotion of a great soap opera: passion, betrayal, scorn, envy, confusion, rage, and more. If you have never had the pleasure of reading Ovid’s Heroides, I highly recommend a few of the following texts on Amazon: Continue Reading

  • Aug 04 / 2014
  • Comments Off on Greek Medicine Part 2, “Give Me Something for the Pain” (Bon Jovi, 1995)
Ancient Greek

Greek Medicine Part 2, “Give Me Something for the Pain” (Bon Jovi, 1995)

Ancient Greek doctor Erasistratus treating Antiochus with Greek medicine

 

by Derick Alexandre, Ph.D.

Hi everybody!

My last post focused on the “ill” effects of some ancient Greek pharmaceuticals, black hellebore in particular. The grueling bouts of vomiting and diarrhea alone would make anyone question the wisdom of administering hellebore, cure or no cure. Yet the Greeks persisted anyway. As Herophilus of Chalcedon said, “Drugs are the hands of the gods.” (Just say no!) Continue Reading

  • Jul 25 / 2014
  • Comments Off on BBC – Life and Death in Herculaneum
Latin

BBC – Life and Death in Herculaneum

herculaneum

 

Posted by Magister Andrew

Take a look at this great video about Herculaneum (passed along by Theo, a friend of the Carmenta Latin School), and find out why this little Italian town and the circumstances of its tragic end can tell us so much about the lives of everyday Romans.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3_wfTPdp3_k

 

 

  • Jul 10 / 2014
  • Comments Off on The Greco-Roman Medicine Chest, Part 1
Ancient Greek

The Greco-Roman Medicine Chest, Part 1

Greek Medicine Hippocrates the Physician and Democritus the Philosopher

 

by Derick Alexandre, Ph.D.

Many of us are familiar, in one way or another, with the local pharmacy, and perhaps can’t imagine life without one, at least for the reliable cold and flu products and standard pain medications that populate the shelves.
Continue Reading

  • Jun 27 / 2014
  • Comments Off on Why Translate Songs (aka, How to Become a Better Latinist in Two Hours)
Latin

Why Translate Songs (aka, How to Become a Better Latinist in Two Hours)

Roman Street Musicians Playing Latin Song mosaic at Naples

 

by Victoria Neuman, M.A.

When I tell people that one of my hobbies is translating popular songs into Latin, the question I usually get is a simple one: Why? What possible utility could there be in changing something as essentially modern as a Coldplay song into something as inherently ancient as a Latin text?
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