:::: MENU ::::

Carmenta Online Blog

  • Aug 03 / 2017
  • Comments Off on Tragedy and the Loss of Ethics
Ancient Greek

Tragedy and the Loss of Ethics

Oedipus and Antigone by Charles Jalabert (1842)

 

By Susi Ferrarello, Ph.D.

Intro

Ethics seem like something that would be particularly helpful when you need to make a decision. In reality, ethics quite often seem to be more of a hindrance than a help. In many situations ethics may just get in the way and complicate the path to a resolution. Continue Reading

  • Aug 01 / 2017
  • Comments Off on Classical Interviews: Julius Caesar
Latin

Classical Interviews: Julius Caesar

Vercingetorix throws down his arms at the feet of Julius Caesar. Painting by Lionel Royer.

 

By André Bastos Gurgel, OAB

This is the first of a series of fictitious interviews with important characters of the ancient Roman and Greek worlds. The idea of made-up interviews first appeared in the writings of the Italian writer Giuseppe Papini, though he ‘interviewed’ people from more recent times. Today’s interview is with Caius Julius Caesar who gladly received me at his domus in Rome. I asked him about his future plans as Rome’s dictator. Continue Reading

  • Jul 27 / 2017
  • Comments Off on Plato, Phones, and That Embarrassing Silence…
Ancient Greek

Plato, Phones, and That Embarrassing Silence…

Plato (left) and Aristotle (right), a detail of The School of Athens, a fresco by Raphael

 

By Susi Ferrarello, Ph.D.

Imagine Plato, the famous philosopher, and Socrates, his teacher, going out for a drink. After half an hour they are already running short of things to say (very difficult to imagine, but nevertheless let’s try) and an awkward silence descends over the conversation. Continue Reading

  • Jul 25 / 2017
  • Comments Off on Homework Suggestion: the Achilleid
Latin

Homework Suggestion: the Achilleid

Chiron teaching Achilles how to play the lyre, a Roman fresco from Herculaneum, 1st century AD

 

By André Bastos Gurgel, OAB

Introduction

Have you read the Latin epic poem the Achilleid? No? Well, neither had I until I bought a dictionary of mythology that happened to mention this overlooked work by the Roman writer Publius Papinius Statius. But after taking a look, it quickly became clear to me that this would make a great homework assignment for Latin students! Continue Reading

  • Jul 20 / 2017
  • Comments Off on The Oral Literature of the Apache, Lushootseed, and Arapaho Tribes
Classical Literature

The Oral Literature of the Apache, Lushootseed, and Arapaho Tribes

Native American Family

 

By André Bastos Gurgel, OAB and Erik Ogle, M.A.

Introduction

Though mostly in oral form, Native Americans have produced some real literary treasures that have been passed down by word-of-mouth for thousands of years. In the following article I’ll be discussing three Native American tribes and their most famous examples of oral poetry. Continue Reading

  • Jul 20 / 2017
  • Comments Off on How to Solve a Basic Algebraic Equation
Education

How to Solve a Basic Algebraic Equation

How to solve a basic Algebraic equation

 

By Andrew Kuhry-Haeuser, Carmenta Founder

1) The #1 rule to remember is that, no matter what, any operation you apply to one side of the equals sign must be applied to the other side of the equals sign, whether it’s addition, subtraction, multiplication, division, exponents, or roots. Continue Reading

  • Jul 18 / 2017
  • 1
Ancient Greek

Art and Classics Series: Leonidas at Thermopylae

"Leonidas at Thermopylae" by Jacques-Louis David

 

By André Bastos Gurgel, OAB

Introduction

This article is one in a series analyzing the close link between art and the classical world and the ways in which visual art can be a tool for teaching young people about classical antiquity. This is certainly what happened to me with the painting above, “Leonidas at Thermopylae” by Jacques-Louis David . When I first saw this painting as a teenager, I decided to read Herodotus and learn more about Leonidas and his 300 Spartans. This launched me on a lifelong journey of discovery of the classical world. Continue Reading

  • Jul 18 / 2017
  • Comments Off on How to Get an “A” in Physics
Education

How to Get an “A” in Physics

How to get an "A" in Physics

 

By Andrew Kuhry-Haeuser, Carmenta Founder

Success in high school or basic college physics comes down to 3 factors:

1) Knowing your formulas.
2) Knowing how to determine which formula applies to the problem you’re trying to solve.
3) Knowing how to solve the equations produced when you apply a formula to a problem. Continue Reading

  • Jul 13 / 2017
  • Comments Off on How to Get an “A” in Biology (and Reduce Your Study Time by Half)
Education

How to Get an “A” in Biology (and Reduce Your Study Time by Half)

How to get an "A" in Biology

 

By Andrew Kuhry-Haeuser, Carmenta Founder

1) Create mnemonic devices for everything you have to memorize.

Success in Biology is more about memorization than anything else, and the reality is that most people aren’t very good natural memorizers. They can still do it, though, if they just use the right mnemonic devices. Continue Reading

  • Jul 13 / 2017
  • 1
Latin

Hyginus: a Perfect Fabulist for Latin Students

“Fabularum liber” by Gaius Julius Hyginus

 

By André Bastos Gurgel, OAB

Introduction

Every ancient civilization has a great corpus of fables. In the case of Greek literature, we are all familiar with writers like Phaedrus and Aesop and their immortal works. Perhaps less well known, though, is the great fabulist Hyginus. Continue Reading

Pages:1234567...40