:::: MENU ::::

Carmenta Online Blog

  • Jun 22 / 2017
  • Comments Off on Homework Suggestion: the Tale of Romulus and Remus
Latin

Homework Suggestion: the Tale of Romulus and Remus

Detail of Romulus and Remus on the allegory of the Tiber River in the Louvre Museum (Paris, France)

 

By André Bastos Gurgel, OAB

Introduction

Do you know why the 21st of April is such an important date? Every true classics enthusiast knows that this is ine of the most important birthdays in history, the birthday of Rome! Continue Reading

  • Jun 20 / 2017
  • Comments Off on Learning Latin with the Vulgate
Latin

Learning Latin with the Vulgate

“Saint Jerome in his study”, by Domenico Ghirlandaio

 

By André Bastos Gurgel, OAB

Introduction

When I started my Latin studies many years ago, I wondered why my tutor wanted me to buy Collin’s “Primer of Ecclesiastical Latin”, a textbook generally used only in seminaries and Catholic colleges. My goal was to read Cicero and Vergil, and at first I didn’t understand why I was starting with the Vulgate. I soon realized, though, that the Vulgate is a great introduction to Latin and a bridge to more advanced texts. In this article I will share my experiences working with this Medieval Latin work. Continue Reading

  • Jun 15 / 2017
  • Comments Off on Great Speeches of Mankind: “Against Catiline”
Latin

Great Speeches of Mankind: “Against Catiline”

Cicero Denounces Catiline, fresco by Cesare Maccari

 

By André Bastos Gurgel, OAB

Introduction

This is the first of a series of articles about great speeches by classical orators. This first article deals with one of the greatest lawyers of mankind, Marcus Tullius Cicero, the famous Roman orator, writer, philosopher and statesman. In this short essay, I will demonstrate how Cicero’s speeches can be turned into effective and exciting homework for Latin students. Continue Reading

  • Jun 13 / 2017
  • Comments Off on Homework Suggestion: the Magna Carta
Latin

Homework Suggestion: the Magna Carta

King John signs the Magna Carta

 

By André Bastos Gurgel, OAB

Introduction

There are an astonishing number of people who think that Medieval Latin has produced no great literary works. They couldn’t be more wrong! Medieval Latin has produced many true jewels of literature, including poetry, novels, and great legal documents like the Magna Carta. Continue Reading

  • Jun 08 / 2017
  • 2
Ancient Greek

The Ethics of Tragedy

Antigone in front of the dead Polynices by Nikiphoros Lytras

 

By Susi Ferrarello, Ph.D.

Do we really need tragedy in our lives? At first the answer seems ridiculously easy. No, thank you.

Yet it seems to me that only tragedy can successfully nurture our inner ethical compass and our sense of empathetic compassion for others and for ourselves. Continue Reading

  • Jun 06 / 2017
  • Comments Off on Heinrich Schliemann: Archaeologist or Fraud?
Ancient Greek

Heinrich Schliemann: Archaeologist or Fraud?

A picture of Henirich Schliemann

 

By André Bastos Gurgel, OAB

Introduction

Most Classics teachers and students have heard of the German archeologist Heinrich Schliemann and many see him as a great scholar who set an example for generations to come. Still, his reputation has been under attack for years, and many people now believe he was nothing but a fraud. In this article I’ll be discussing Schliemann and the controversy that surrounds him. Continue Reading

  • May 30 / 2017
  • Comments Off on The Bibliotheka: a Compendium of Greek Mythology
Ancient Greek

The Bibliotheka: a Compendium of Greek Mythology

Capturing the Erymanthian Boar

 

By André Bastos Gurgel, OAB

Introduction

I first became interested in classics as a child when I heard the great tales of Greek mythology, stories like the Trojan War, the labors of Heracles, and the Minotaur. Exposure to these fascinating legends in childhood increases the chances that the child will one day become an enthusiast of classical literature or even a classicist. However, one thing has always puzzled me: what is our source of all these stories? How do we know about them? Continue Reading

  • May 25 / 2017
  • Comments Off on Learning Latin with Publilius Syrus
Latin

Learning Latin with Publilius Syrus

Publilius Syrus

 

By André Bastos Gurgel, OAB

Introduction

Although proverbs and maxims are by their nature very brief, they can contain a tremendous amount of wisdom. And in my mind one of the wisest writers of proverbs was Publilius Syrus! His writing has provided many generations with precious life lessons, and I therefore have no doubt that this present generation of Latin students is no different. In this article, as a means of introduction for those not yet familiar with his work, I have selected three sample proverbs of his. Continue Reading

  • May 23 / 2017
  • Comments Off on Res Gestae Divi Augusti: An Emperor’s Autobiography
Latin

Res Gestae Divi Augusti: An Emperor’s Autobiography

Caesar Augustus bust

 

By André Bastos Gurgel, OAB

Introduction

Have you heard of Augustus Caesar? What a silly question! Of course you have. But did you know that he wrote a first-person account of his own life? That’s right! Augustus left the text in his will, instructing the Senate to engrave the text on a pair of bronze pillars in front of his mausoleum. In this article I will be discussing three excerpts from the Res Gestae and explaining why I think this text is so great for intermediate Latin students. Continue Reading