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Posts Tagged / education

  • Jan 23 / 2018
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Education

Interview with Carmenta’s Erik Ogle, Master of More than 20 Languages

Carmenta polyglot instructor Erik Ogle

 

By André Bastos Gurgel, OAB

Q: When did you first become interested in languages?
A: Although I grew up hearing both Swedish and English around the house, I don’t think I really got interested in actively learning other languages until I started taking French in the 6th grade and, around the same time, was given an old copy (1910 edition) of Bennet’s Latin Grammar by my grandmother. Continue Reading

  • Nov 30 / 2017
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Latin

Mind Maps: A Great Strategy for Language Learning

Mind map

 

By André Bastos Gurgel, OAB

Introduction

Most of my life I have been an avid enthusiast of language learning, both modern and ancient. So far I have achieved an advanced level in English, Portuguese, Latin, Mandarin, Spanish, French, Italian, and German; I have a working knowledge of Danish, Hebrew, Ancient Greek, and Sanskrit; and I’m in the early stages of learning Old English and Old Norse. Continue Reading

  • Oct 31 / 2017
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Latin

Claudian: an Overlooked Writer

Olympus: The Fall of the Giants by Francisco Bayeu

 

By André Bastos Gurgel, OAB

Introduction

Have you ever heard of the Roman writer Claudian? If you haven’t, you can’t be blamed since he’s been mostly ignored, not having lived in the so-called “Golden Age of Latin Literature”. I found out about him totally by chance when I was researching writers from the late empire. As you may know, at Carmenta we make an effort to rehabilitate good Latin writers who may have been overlooked simply because of the time when they were born, and so in this article I’ll do my best to give you the main points. Continue Reading

  • Oct 05 / 2017
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English

The Banning of Shakespeare in English Schools

Shakespeare’s portrait

 

By André Bastos Gurgel, OAB and John Priest, B.A Cert. Min

Introduction

If you liked my article on the novel Fahrenheit 451, you will probably enjoy today’s story about an instance in which Ray Bradbury’s prophecy came true. Bradbury’s book describes a dystopian society where reading books is forbidden. It may sound too fantastic to come true, but something like it happened in 2009 when the English authorities removed the obligation to study Shakespeare’s works from public school curricula. Continue Reading

  • Sep 19 / 2017
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Latin

Latin Translation of the Bhagavad Gita

Bhagavad Gita, a 19th-century manuscript

 

By André Bastos Gurgel, OAB

Introduction

The Bhagavad Gita is one of the greatest jewels of world literature. Aldous Huxley said, “The Bhagavad-Gita is the most systematic statement of spiritual evolution of endowing value to mankind. It is one of the most clear and comprehensive summaries of perennial philosophy ever revealed; hence its enduring value is subject not only to India but to all of humanity”. Continue Reading

  • Aug 24 / 2017
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Classical Literature

Overlooked Literature: Old Norse

Manuscript of Prose Edda (Iceland, 1765-1766)

 

By André Bastos Gurgel, OAB

Introduction

This article is part of a series on literature produced in a variety or archaic and modern languages, including Old English, Old Irish, Chinese, Irish, and Gaelic. In this article I focus on the great literary tradition of the Norse peoples. Continue Reading

  • Aug 10 / 2017
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Ancient Greek

Tryphiodorus and The Fall of Troy

The Burning of Troy (1759/62), oil painting by Johann Georg Trautmann

 

By André Bastos Gurgel, OAB

Introduction

I first became fascinated with the story of the Trojan War as a child. When I read the Iliad for the first time, I was intrigued by the fact that Homer never mentioned how Troy fell. I eventually realized there was a gap between the events of the Iliad and those of the Odyssey. It turns out that Homer did write about the fall of Troy, but only fragments of that text have survived. Continue Reading

  • Aug 08 / 2017
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Latin

Learning Latin with Asterix

“Asterix the Gaul” in Latin

 

By André Bastos Gurgel, OAB

Introduction

This is the first article in a series about the Asterix comic books, written by René Goscinny and illustrated by Albert Uderzo, which have also been translated into Latin. I first read the Asterix books when I was ten years old, and the collection was instrumental in helping me develop a taste for classics, with its many allusions to classical culture and education. Continue Reading

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